July 2019 SIGCOMM Newsletter

July 2019 SIGCOMM Newsletter
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Contents
SIGCOMM 50th Anniversary panel
Announcing changes to the SIGCOMM Executive Committee
Computer Communication Review (The ACM Newsletter), The July 2019 Issue
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SIGCOMM 50th Anniversary panel
 
As part of the commemoration of the 50th anniversary of SIGCOMM, a panel discussion on "Past and Future Directions in Networking Research" will be held during the first session of the SIGCOMM conference on Wednesday, August 21. The panel will start with a brief introductory video by Vint Cerf before opening up to discussions with our panelists. The panelists will be Dah Ming Chiu (Chinese University of Hong Kong), Manya Ghobadi  (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), Mark Handley (University College, London) , Jennifer Rexford (Princeton University), and Lixia Zhang (University of California at Los Angeles), and the discussion will be moderated by Bruce Maggs (Duke University and Akamai Technologies).
 

Announcing changes to the SIGCOMM Executive Committee
 
After serving for a little over two years as SIGCOMM vice-chair, Aditya Akella has asked to step down.  We would like to thank him for his efforts in promoting the SIG and advancing its agenda during that period.  It represents a non-trivial amount of time and energy.
As per the SIG's bylaws regarding vacancies and appointments, in such instances the board is tasked with selecting a replacement, and while we are sad to see Aditya go, we are delighted to announce that Sujata Banerjee has agreed to serve as the new SIG vice-chair. 
Please join us in thanking Aditya for his service and welcoming Sujata in her new role.

Computer Communication Review (The ACM Newsletter), The July 2019 Issue
 
This July 2019 issue contains two technical papers and three editorial notes. In ”Securing Linux with a Faster and Scalable IPtables”, Sebastiano Miano and his colleagues revisit how Linux firewalls work. Since version 2.4.0 of the Linux kernel, iptables has been the standard way of defining firewall rules in Linux. These iptables are widely used, but writing and maintaining them can be difficult. Furthermore, they have some limitations in terms of performance. This paper leverages the eBPF virtual machine that is included in the Linux kernel to propose a replacement for iptables that preserves their semantics while providing im- proved performance. They release their implementation and evaluate its performance in details.
 
In ”Towards Passive Analysis of Anycast in Global Routing: Unintended Impact of Remote Peering”, Rui Bian et al. analyse the deployment of anycast services. For this, they rely on different BGP routing information and highlight the impact of remote peering on anycast performance. They release their data and analysis scripts.
 
In addition to these two peer-reviewed papers, this issue contains three editorials. In ”Privacy Trading in the Surveillance Capitalism Age: Viewpoints on ‘Privacy- Preserving’ Societal Value Creation”, Ranjan Pal and Jon Crowcroft reconsider the current Mobile App ecosystem from an economical and privacy viewpoint. They show that the current model is not the only possible one and propose the idea of a regulated privacy trading mechanism that provides a better compromise between privacy and the commercial interests of companies. In ”Datacenter Congestion Control: Identifying what is essential and making it practical”, Aisha Mushtaq et al. take a step back at the datacenter congestion control problem. They argue that congestion control mechanisms that use Shortest-Remaining- Processing-Time are the best solution and discuss in the paper how commodity switches could be modified to support it. Finally, in ”The 11th Workshop on Active Internet Measurements (AIMS-11) Workshop Report”, kc Claffy and Dave Clark summarise the discussions at the latest AIMS workshop. They mention several new measurement ini- tiatives and interesting research projects.