A survey of interdomain routing policies

By: 
Phillipa Gill, Michael Schapira, Sharon Goldberg
Appears in: 
CCR January 2014
Researchers studying the inter-domain routing system typically rely on models to ll in the gaps created by the lack of information about the business relationships and routing policies used by individual autonomous systems. To shed light on this unknown information, we asked  100 network
operators about their routing policies, billing models, and thoughts on routing security. This short paper reports the survey's results and discusses their implications.
Public Review By: 
Jia Wang

Interdomain routing has been extensively studied over the past decade by both research and industrial communities. While tremendous knowledge and understanding have been gained on various aspects of the Interdomain routing (including routing policies), there are some gaps that remain to be filled. What make this paper interesting and distinguish itself from many other paper on interdomain routing policies is that this paper intended to bridge one of these knowledge gaps by conducting a survey on business relationships and routing policies used by individual autonomous systems in practice. About 100 network operators responded to the survey and answered questions about their routing policies, billing models, and thoughts on routing security. The paper presented survey results and discussed their implications. While most of results provided a systematic view of interdomain routing policies used in practice and on the extent to which common modeling assumptions about routing policies actually hold on the Internet, some of the findings are quite interesting and require deeper understanding on their implications. For example, the survey results showed that 90% of operators disabled MRAI timer which is used to rate limit update messages between neighboring BGP-speaking routers. This paper provided a good starting point on some of these findings. Follow up studies that look deeper into these findings would be of great interest to the research community and can potentially impact network operators for setting their policies in the future. One limitation of this paper is that survey results only represented a somewhat bias view from the 100 operators who were questioned and responded. Having said that, I believe these results provided very useful information on the operational reality of interdomain routing policies. Researchers and students who work on the interdomain routing area would find this survey beneficial.