Thomas Moscibroda

White Space Networking with Wi-Fi like Connectivity

By: 
Paramvir Bahl, Ranveer Chandra, Thomas Moscibroda, Rohan Murty, and Matt Welsh
Appears in: 
CCR October 2009

Networking over UHF white spaces is fundamentally different from conventional Wi-Fi along three axes: spatial variation, temporal variation, and fragmentation of the UHF spectrum. Each of these differences gives rise to new challenges for implementing a wireless network in this band. We present the design and implementation of WhiteFi, the firstWi-Fi like system constructed on top of UHF white spaces. WhiteFi incorporates a new adaptive spectrum assignment algorithm to handle spectrum variation and fragmentation, and proposes a low overhead protocol to handle temporal variation.

Donnybrook: Enabling Large-Scale, High-Speed, Peer-to-Peer Games

By: 
Ashwin Bharambe, John R. Douceur, Jacob R. Lorch, Thomas Moscibroda, Jeffrey Pang, Srinivasan Seshan, and Xinyu Zhuang
Appears in: 
CCR October 2008

Without well-provisioned dedicated servers, modern fast-paced action games limit the number of players who can interact simultaneously to 16-32. This is because interacting players must frequently exchange state updates, and high player counts would exceed the bandwidth available to participating machines. In this paper, we describe Donnybrook, a system that enables epicscale battles without dedicated server resources, even in a fastpaced game with tight latency bounds. It achieves this scalability through two novel components.

A Case for Adapting Channel Width in Wireless Networks

By: 
Ranveer Chandra, Ratul Mahajan, Thomas Moscibroda, Ramya Raghavendra, and Paramvir Bahl
Appears in: 
CCR October 2008

We study a fundamental yet under-explored facet in wireless communication – the width of the spectrum over which transmitters spread their signals, or the channel width. Through detailed measurements in controlled and live environments, and using only commodity 802.11 hardware, we first quantify the impact of channel width on throughput, range, and power consumption. Taken together, our findings make a strong case for wireless systems that adapt channel width. Such adaptation brings unique benefits.

Lottery Trees: Motivational Deployment of Networked Systems

By: 
John R. Douceur and Thomas Moscibroda
Appears in: 
CCR October 2007

We address a critical deployment issue for network systems, namely motivating people to install and run a distributed service. This work is aimed primarily at peer-to-peer systems, in which the decision and effort to install a service falls to individuals rather than to a central planner. This problem is relevant for bootstrapping systems that rely on the network effect, wherein the benefits are not felt until deployment reaches a significant scale, and also for deploying asymmetric systems, wherein the set of contributors is different than the set of beneficiaries.

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