S. Keshav

IP address multiplexing for VEEs

By: 
R. Singh, T. Brecht, S. Keshav
Appears in: 
CCR April 2014

Public Review By: 
Phillipa Gill

The popularity of public viral execution environments (VEEs) such as Amazon EC2, and their need for public IP addresses, is at odds with the dwindling pool of IPv4 addresses available on the Internet today. This paper aims to address the challenge of multiplexing a small pool of IPv4 addresses across a set of VEEs. While solutions for sharing an IP address across clients (e.g., NATs) have been quite popular, these solutions generally do not work well for sharing IP addresses across server hosts.This paper surveys the design space for multiplexing IP addresses across servers in VEEs and presents implementation and evaluation of three potential schemes: application layer multiplexing on the host, pairing a DNS and DHCP server, and pairing DNS with an agent that runs within the VEE. The authors find that pairing DNS with an agent running on the VEE performs the best in terms of reducing latency, minimizing required IP addresses, and is legacy compatible. The reviewers agreed that the paper presents an interesting design point for solving the challenge of multiplexing IP addresses in VEEs and raised many interesting avenues that the authors could explore in future work. These include understanding security properties of the solution as well how to extend the solution to VEEs with varying demands on network resources (e.g., long-lived but barely active connections).

October 2012: Editor Message

By: 
S. Keshav
Appears in: 
CCR October 2012

I considered many ideas for my last CCR editorial but, in the end, decided to write about something that I think I share with every reader of CCR, yet is something we rarely acknowledge even in conversation, let alone in print: the joy of research.

January 2012: Editor Message

By: 
S. Keshav
Appears in: 
CCR January 2012

I'd like to devote this editorial to a description of the process we use to select and publish papers submitted to CCR. CCR publishes two types of papers: technical papers and editorials.  I'll first describe the process for technical papers then for editorials.

October 2011: Editor's Message

By: 
S. Keshav
Appears in: 
CCR October 2011

This editorial was motivated by a panel on the relationship between academia and industry at the SIGCOMM 2011 conference that was moderated by Bruce Davie. I can claim some familiarity with the topic having spent roughly ten years each in academia and industry during the last twenty years.

July 2011: Editor's Message

By: 
S. Keshav
Appears in: 
CCR July 2011

This edition of CCR bears a dubious distinction of having no technical articles, only editorial content. This is not because no technical articles were submitted: in fact, there were 13 technical submissions. However, all of them were rejected by the Area Editors on the advice of the reviewers, a decision that I did express concern with, but could not, in good conscience, overturn.

April 2011: Editor's Message: Going Online

By: 
S. Keshav
Appears in: 
CCR April 2011

Twenty years ago, when I was still a graduate student, going online meant firing up a high-speed 1200 baud modem and typing text on a Z19 glass terminal to interact with my university’s VAX 11/780 server. Today, this seems quaint, if not downright archaic. Fast forwarding twenty years from now, it seems very likely that reading newspapers and magazines on paper will seem equally quaint, if not downright wasteful. It is clear that the question is when, not if, CCR goes completely online.

January 2011: Editor's Message: The Goal of Systems Research

By: 
S. Keshav
Appears in: 
CCR January 2011

What is, or ought to be, the goal of systems research? The answer to this question differs for academics and researchers in industry. Researchers in the industry usually work either directly or indirectly on a specific commercial project, and are therefore constrained to design and build a system that fits manifest needs. They do not need to worry about a goal beyond this somewhat narrow horizon. For instance, a researcher at Google may be given the task of building an efficient file system: higher level goals beyond this are meaningless to him or her.

October 2010: Editor's Message: Assumptions

By: 
S. Keshav
Appears in: 
CCR October 2010

When I took my oral qualifying exam at Berkeley many years ago, my seniors told me that if I made it past the assumptions slide, I would pass. Assumptions are the foundations on which a dissertation is built and the examining committee subjects a candidate’s assumptions to harsh analysis. If the assumptions are correct, then the rest of the dissertation, even if flawed, is correctible. Nothing can rescue a dissertation built on incorrect assumptions.

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