Nick McKeown

Examples of Research Affecting the Practice of Networking

By: 
Bruce Davie, Christophe Diot, Lars Eggert, Nick McKeown, Venkat Padmanabhan, Renata Teixeira (SIGCOMM Industrial Liaison Board)
Appears in: 
CCR October 2015

As networking researchers, we love to work on ideas that improve the practice of networking. In the early pioneering days of the Internet the link between networking researchers and practitioners was strong; the community was small and everyone knew each other. Not only were there many important ideas from the research community that affected the practice of networking, we were all very aware of them.

Examples of Research Affecting the Practice of Networking

By: 
Bruce Davie, Christophe Diot, Lars Eggert, Nick McKeown, Venkat Padmanabhan, Renata Teixeira
Appears in: 
CCR April 2015

As networking researchers, we love to work on ideas that improve the practice of networking. In the early pioneering days of the Internet the link between networking researchers and practitioners was strong; the community was small and everyone knew each other. Not only were there many important ideas from the research community that affected the practice of networking, we were all very aware of them.

A buffer-based approach to rate adaptation: evidence from a large video streaming service

By: 
Te-Yuan Huang, Ramesh Johari, Nick McKeown, Matthew Trunnell, Mark Watson
Appears in: 
CCR August 2014

Existing ABR algorithms face a significant challenge in estimating future capacity: capacity can vary widely over time, a phenomenon commonly observed in commercial services. In this work, we suggest an alternative approach: rather than presuming that capacity estimation is required, it is perhaps better to begin by using only the buffer, and then ask when capacity estimation is needed. We test the viability of this approach through a series of experiments spanning millions of real users in a commercial service.

Enlarging the SIGCOMM tent

By: 
Nick McKeown
Appears in: 
CCR January 2014
At every Sigcomm conference the corridors buzz with ideas about how to improve Sigcomm. It is a healthy sign that the premier conference in networking keeps debating how to reinvent and improve itself. In 2012 I got the chance to throw my hat into the ring; at the end of a talk I spent a
few minutes describing why I think the Sigcomm conference should be greatly expanded. A few people encouraged me to write the ideas down.

Architecting for Innovation

By: 
Teemu Koponen, Scott Shenker, Hari Balakrishnan, Nick Feamster, Igor Ganichev, Ali Ghodsi, P. Brighten Godfrey, Nick McKeown, Guru Parulkar, Barath Raghavan, Jennifer Rexford, Somaya Arianfar, and Dmitriy Kuptsov
Appears in: 
CCR July 2011

We argue that the biggest problem with the current Internet architecture is not a particular functional deficiency, but its inability to accommodate innovation. To address this problem we propose a minimal architectural “framework” in which comprehensive architectures can reside. The proposed Framework for Internet Innovation (FII) — which is derived from the simple observation that network interfaces should be extensible and abstract — allows for a diversity of architectures to coexist, communicate, and evolve.

OpenRoads: Empowering Research in Mobile Networks

By: 
Kok-Kiong Yap, Masayoshi Kobayashi, Rob Sherwood, Te-Yuan Huang, Michael Chan, Nikhil Handigol, and Nick McKeown
Appears in: 
CCR January 2010

We present OpenRoads, an open-source platform for innovation in mobile networks. OpenRoads enable researchers to innovate using their own production networks, through providing an wireless extension OpenFlow. Therefore, you can think of OpenRoads as "OpenFlow Wireless".

Carving Research Slices Out of Your Production Networks with OpenFlow

By: 
Rob Sherwood, Michael Chan, Adam Covington, Glen Gibb, Mario Flajslik, Nikhil Handigol, Te-Yuan Huang, Peyman Kazemian, Masayoshi Kobayashi, Jad Naous, Srinivasan Seetharaman, David Underhill, Tatsuya Yabe, Kok-Kiong Yap, Yiannis Yiakoumis, Hongyi Zeng, Guido Appenzeller, Ramesh Johari, Nick McKeown, and Guru Parulkar
Appears in: 
CCR January 2010

OpenFlow has been demonstrated as a way for researchers to run networking experiments in their production network. Last year, we demonstrated how an OpenFlow controller running on NOX could move VMs seamlessly around an OpenFlow network. While OpenFlow has potential to open control of the network, only one researcher can innovate on the network at a time. What is required is a way to divide, or slice, network resources so that researchers and network administrators can use them in parallel.

Buffer Sizing results for RCP Congestion Control under Connection Arrivals and Departures

By: 
Ashvin Lakshmikantha, R. Srikant, Nandita Dukkipati, Nick McKeown, and Carolyn Beck
Appears in: 
CCR January 2009

Buffer sizing has received a lot of attention recently since it is becoming increasingly difficult to use large buffers in highspeed routers. Much of the prior work has concentrated on analyzing the amount of buffering required in core routers assuming that TCP carries all the data traffic. In this paper, we evaluate the amount of buffering required for RCP on a single congested link, while explicitly modeling flow arrivals and departures.

Public Review By: 
Darryl Veitch

This paper considers the effect of bottleneck buffer size in single-bottleneck networks using processor sharing, or more specifically, a max-min flavor of the RCP protocol, on a single congested link. It is one of few papers which consider the dynamics of flow arrivals and departures. The paper provides many interesting results on the problem of buffer sizing using RCP. Of particular interest are theorems 1 and 3, which provide very clean characterizations of the probability of buffer overflow, in the case of exclusively long flows, and exclusively short (non-reactive) flows, respectively. The overall conclusion is that, under RCP, buffers can be small, at no more than 10% of the overall bandwidth delay product, and simulation results at the end of the paper back this up for more realistic mixed traffic scenarios.
The paper is well organized and a pleasure to read. Although the analysis involves some fairly strong assumptions, it provides a useful view on the idea that communication protocols can provide good performance with buffer sizes that are very much lower than the bandwidth-delay product dimensioning rule in use today. A particularly nice result is an explanation for why the loss probability under a small buffer may actually decrease at higher load in some circumstances. To understand why, well you will have to read the paper.

NOX: Towards an Operating System for Networks

By: 
Natasha Gude, Teemu Koponen, Justin Pettit, Ben Pfaff, Martín Casado, Nick McKeown, and Scott Shenker
Appears in: 
CCR July 2008

As anyone who has operated a large network can attest, enterprise networks are difficult to manage. That they have remained so despite significant commercial and academic efforts suggests the need for a different network management paradigm. Here we turn to operating systems as an instructive example in taming management complexity...

OpenFlow: Enabling Innovation in Campus Networks

By: 
Nick McKeown, Tom Anderson, Hari Balakrishnan, Guru Parulkar, Larry Peterson, Jennifer Rexford, Scott Shenker, and Jonathan Turner
Appears in: 
CCR April 2008

This whitepaper proposes OpenFlow: a way for researchers to run experimental protocols in the networks they use every day. OpenFlow is based on an Ethernet switch, with an internal flow-table, and a standardized interface to add and remove flow entries. Our goal is to encourage networking vendors to add OpenFlow to their switch products for deployment in college campus backbones and wiring closets.

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