Lars Eggert

Examples of Research Affecting the Practice of Networking

By: 
Bruce Davie, Christophe Diot, Lars Eggert, Nick McKeown, Venkat Padmanabhan, Renata Teixeira (SIGCOMM Industrial Liaison Board)
Appears in: 
CCR October 2015

As networking researchers, we love to work on ideas that improve the practice of networking. In the early pioneering days of the Internet the link between networking researchers and practitioners was strong; the community was small and everyone knew each other. Not only were there many important ideas from the research community that affected the practice of networking, we were all very aware of them.

Examples of Research Affecting the Practice of Networking

By: 
Bruce Davie, Christophe Diot, Lars Eggert, Nick McKeown, Venkat Padmanabhan, Renata Teixeira
Appears in: 
CCR April 2015

As networking researchers, we love to work on ideas that improve the practice of networking. In the early pioneering days of the Internet the link between networking researchers and practitioners was strong; the community was small and everyone knew each other. Not only were there many important ideas from the research community that affected the practice of networking, we were all very aware of them.

How to Contribute Research Results to Internet Standardization

By: 
Marcelo Bagnulo, Philip Eardley, Lars Eggert, and Rolf Winter
Appears in: 
CCR July 2011

The development of new technology is driven by scientific research. The Internet, with its roots in the ARPANET and NSFNet, is no exception. Many of the fundamental, long-term improvements to the architecture, security, end-to-end protocols and management of the Internet originate in the related academic research communities. Even shorter-term, more commercially driven extensions are oftentimes derived from academic research. When interoperability is required, the IETF standardizes such new technology.

Dagstuhl Perspectives Workshop on End-to-End Protocols for the Future Internet

By: 
Jari Arkko, Bob Briscoe, Lars Eggert, Anja Feldmann, and Mark Handley
Appears in: 
CCR April 2009

This article summarises the presentations and discussions during a workshop on end-to-end protocols for the future Internet in June 2008. The aim of the workshop was to establish a dialogue at the interface between two otherwise fairly distinct communities working on future Internet protocols: those developing internetworking functions and those developing end-to-end transport protocols. The discussion established near-consensus on some of the open issues, such as the preferred placement of traffic engineering functionality, whereas other questions remained controversial.

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