kc claffy

The 7th Workshop on Active Internet Measurements (AIMS-7) Report

By: 
kc claffy
Appears in: 
CCR January 2016

On 31 March - 2 April 2015, CAIDA hosted the seventh Workshop on Active Internet Measurements (AIMS-7) as part of our series of Internet Statistics and Metrics Analysis (ISMA) workshops. As with previous AIMS workshops, the goals were to further our understanding of the potential and limitations of active measurement research and infrastructure in the wide-area Internet, and to promote cooperative solutions and coordinated strategies between academics, industry, policymakers, and funding agencies.

Workshop on Internet Economics (WIE2014) Final Report

By: 
kc claffy, D. Clark
Appears in: 
CCR July 2015

On December 10-11 2014, we hosted the 4th interdisciplinary Workshop on Internet Economics (WIE) at the UC San Diego’s Supercomputer Center. This workshop series provides a forum for researchers, Internet facilities and service providers, technologists, economists, theorists, policy makers, and other stakeholders to inform current and emerging regulatory and policy debates. The objective for this year’s workshop was a structured consideration of whether and how policy-makers should try to shape the future of the Internet.

Errata for SIGCOMM CCR (Vol. 44, Issue 1, January, 2014) Estimating Internet Address Space Usage through Passive Measurements

By: 
A. Dainotti, K. Benson, A. King, kc claffy, M. Kallitsis, E. Glatz, X. Dimitropoulos
Appears in: 
CCR April 2014

This errata is to help viewers/readers identify/properly understand our contribution to the SIGCOMM CCR Newsletter. Volume 44 Issue 1, (January 2014) on pages 42-49.

Estimating internet address space usage through passive measurements

By: 
Alberto Dainotti, Karyn Benson, Alistair King, kc claffy, Michael Kallitsis, Eduard Glatz, Xenofontas Dimitropoulos
Appears in: 
CCR January 2014
One challenge in understanding the evolution of Internet infrastructure is the lack of systematic mechanisms for monitoring the extent to which allocated IP addresses are actually used. Address utilization has been monitored via actively scanning the entire IPv4 address space. We evaluate
Public Review By: 
Renata Teixeira

This paper presents a novel approach for estimating the fraction of the IP address space that is actively used. The state-of-the-art in this area, ISI's Census project, issues active probes to every address block on the IPv4 space. Active probing suffers from high probing overhead. With the adoption of IPv6, any technique based solely on probing the entire address space may no longer work. The solution presented in this paper passively observes traffic to infer the fraction of used IPv4 address space. They say that an address block is used if it is sending or receiving traffic. Passive measurements introduce no probing overhead and hence the technique can potentially scale for IPv6. The use of passive measurements, however, brings two challenges. First, one single vantage point cannot observe traffic from all active addresses. Second, spoofed addresses may cause the technique to infer that an address is active when it is not. The main contributions of this paper are: (i) to show empirically that passive measurements do observe a large fraction of the used address space; and (ii) a technique to filter spoofed addresses. All reviewers appreciated the well thought-out approach presented in this paper. Although the estimation technique is simple (i.e., observed addresses minus spoofed ones), reviewers particularly liked the techniques to filter out spoofed addresses in two types of datasets: netflow traces and packet traces collected at darknets. Reviewers also acknowledged the validation and evaluation effort in the paper. Reviewers did give a number of suggestions to improve the presentation of the paper both to clarify explanations and get the ideas across more concisely. For example, the comparison with the ISI

The 5th workshop on active internet measurements (AIMS-5) report

By: 
kc claffy
Appears in: 
CCR July 2013

On February 6-8, 2013, CAIDA hosted the fifth Workshop on Active Internet Measurements (AIMS-5) as part of our series of Internet Statistics and Metrics Analysis (ISMA) workshops. As with previous AIMS workshops, the goals were to further our understanding of the potential and limitations of active measurement research and infrastructure in the wide-area Internet, and to promote cooperative solutions and coordinated strategies to address future data needs of the network and security operations and research communities.

Workshop on internet economics (WIE2012) report

By: 
kc claffy, David Clark
Appears in: 
CCR July 2013

On December 12-13 2012, CAIDA and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) hosted the (invitation-only) 3rd interdisciplinary Workshop on Internet Economics (WIE) at the University of California's San Diego Supercomputer Center. The goal of this workshop series is to provide a forum for researchers, commercial Internet facilities and service providers, technologists, economists, theorists, policy makers, and other stakeholders to empirically inform current and emerging regulatory and policy debates. The theme for this year's workshop was "Definitions and Data".

Workshop report: darkspace and unsolicited traffic analysis (DUST 2012)

By: 
Tanja Zseby, kc claffy
Appears in: 
CCR October 2012

On May 14-15, 2012, CAIDA hosted the first international Workshop on Darkspace and Unsolicited Traffic Analysis (DUST 2012) to provide a forum for discussion of the science, engineering, and policy challenges associated with darkspace and unsolicited traffic analysis. This report captures threads discussed at the workshop and lists resulting collaborations.

The 4th workshop on active internet measurements (AIMS-4) report

By: 
kc claffy
Appears in: 
CCR July 2012

On February 8-10, 2012, CAIDA hosted the fourth Workshop on Active Internet Measurements (AIMS-4) as part of our series of Internet Statistics and Metrics Analysis (ISMA) workshops. As with the previous three AIMS workshops, the goals were to further our understanding of the potential and limitations of active measurement research and infrastructure in the wide-area Internet, and to promote cooperative solutions and coordinated strategies to address future data needs of the network and security operations and research communities.

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