Jeffrey C. Mogul

Condor: Better Topologies Through Declarative Design

By: 
Brandon Schlinker, Radhika Niranjan Mysore, Sean Smith, Jeffrey C. Mogul, Amin Vahdat, Minlan Yu, Ethan Katz-Bassett, Michael Rubin
Appears in: 
CCR August 2015

The design space for large, multipath datacenter networks is large and complex, and no one design fits all purposes. Network architects must trade off many criteria to design costeffective, reliable, and maintainable networks, and typically cannot explore much of the design space. We present Condor, our approach to enabling a rapid, efficient design cycle. Condor allows architects to express their requirements as constraints via a Topology Description Language (TDL), rather than having to directly specify network structures.

Towards more constructive reviewing of SIGCOMM papers

By: 
Jeffrey C. Mogul
Appears in: 
CCR July 2013

Many people in CS in general, and SIGCOMM in particular, have expressed concerns about an increasingly "hypercritical" approach to reviewing, which can block or discourage the publication of innovative research. The SIGCOMM Technical Steering Committee (TSC) has been addressing this issue, with the goal of encouraging cultural change without undermining the integrity of peer review. Based on my experience as an author, PC member, TSC member, and occasional PC chair, I examine possible causes for hypercritical reviewing, and offer some advice for PC chairs, reviewers, and authors.

What we talk about when we talk about cloud network performance

By: 
Jeffrey C. Mogul, Lucian Popa
Appears in: 
CCR October 2012

Infrastructure-as-a-Service ("Cloud") data-centers intrinsically depend on high-performance networks to connect servers within the data-center and to the rest of the world. Cloud providers typically offer different service levels, and associated prices, for different sizes of virtual machine, memory, and disk storage. However, while all cloud providers provide network connectivity to tenant VMs, they seldom make any promises about network performance, and so cloud tenants suffer from highly-variable, unpredictable network performance.

Report on the SIGCOMM 2011 conference

By: 
John W. Byers, Jeffrey C. Mogul, Fadel Adib, Jay Aikat, Danai Chasaki, Ming-Hung Chen, Marshini Chetty, Romain Fontugne, Vijay Gabale, László Gyarmati, Katrina LaCurts, Qi Liao, Marc Mendonca, Trang Cao Minh, S.H. Shah Newaz, Pawan Prakash, Yan Shvartzshnaider, Praveen Yalagandula, Chun-Yu Yang
Appears in: 
CCR January 2012

This document provides reports on the presentations at the SIGCOMM 2011 Conference, the annual conference of the ACM Special Interest Group on Data Communication (SIGCOMM).

Report on WREN 2009 -- Workshop: Research on Enterprise Networking

By: 
Nathan Farrington, Nikhil Handigol, Christoph Mayer, Kok-Kiong Yap, and Jeffrey C. Mogul
Appears in: 
CCR January 2010

WREN 2009, the Workshop on Research on Enterprise Networking, was held on August 21, 2009, in conjunction with SIGCOMM 2009 in Barcelona. WREN focussed on research challenges and results specific to enterprise and data-center networks. Details about the workshop, including the organizers and the papers presented, are at http://conferences.sigcomm.org/sigcomm/2009/workshops/wren/index.php.

Open Issues in Organizing Computer Systems Conferences

By: 
Jeffrey C. Mogul and Tom Anderson
Appears in: 
CCR July 2008

The Workshop on Organizing Workshops, Conferences, and Symposia for Computer Systems (WOWCS) was organized to “bring together conference organizers (past, present, and future) and other interested people to discuss the issues they confront.” In conjunction with WOWCS, we survey some previous publications that discuss open issues related to organizing computer systems conferences, especially concerning conduct and management of the review process. We also list some topics about which we wish WOWCS had received submissions, but did not; these could be good topics for future articles.

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