Ion Stoica

Efficient Coflow Scheduling Without Prior Knowledge

By: 
Mosharaf Chowdhury, Ion Stoica
Appears in: 
CCR August 2015

Inter-coflow scheduling improves application-level communication performance in data-parallel clusters. However, existing efficient schedulers require a priori coflow information and ignore cluster dynamics like pipelining, task failures, and speculative executions, which limit their applicability. Schedulers without prior knowledge compromise on performance to avoid head-of-line blocking. In this paper, we present Aalo that strikes a balance and efficiently schedules coflows without prior knowledge.

Low Latency Geo-distributed Data Analytics

By: 
Qifan Pu, Ganesh Ananthanarayanan, Peter Bodik, Srikanth Kandula, Aditya Akella, Paramvir Bahl, Ion Stoica
Appears in: 
CCR August 2015

Low latency analytics on geographically distributed datasets (across datacenters, edge clusters) is an upcoming and increasingly important challenge. The dominant approach of aggregating all the data to a single datacenter significantly inflates the timeliness of analytics. At the same time, running queries over geo-distributed inputs using the current intra-DC analytics frameworks also leads to high query response times because these frameworks cannot cope with the relatively low and variable capacity of WAN links. We present Iridium, a system for low latency geo-distributed analytics.

Efficient coflow scheduling with Varys

By: 
Mosharaf Chowdhury, Yuan Zhong, Ion Stoica
Appears in: 
CCR August 2014

Communication in data-parallel applications often involves a collection of parallel flows. Traditional techniques to optimize flowlevel metrics do not perform well in optimizing such collections, because the network is largely agnostic to application-level requirements. The recently proposed coflow abstraction bridges this gap and creates new opportunities for network scheduling. In this paper, we address inter-coflow scheduling for two different objectives: decreasing communication time of data-intensive jobs and guaranteeing predictable communication time.

Pathlet Routing

By: 
P. Brighten Godfrey, Igor Ganichev, Scott Shenker, and Ion Stoica
Appears in: 
CCR October 2009

We present a new routing protocol, pathlet routing, in which networks advertise fragments of paths, called pathlets, that sources concatenate into end-to-end source routes. Intuitively, the pathlet is a highly exible building block, capturing policy constraints as well as enabling an exponentially large number of path choices. In particular, we show that pathlet routing can emulate the policies of BGP, source routing, and several recent multipath proposals.

A Policy-aware Switching Layer for Data Centers

By: 
Dilip A. Joseph, Arsalan Tavakoli, and Ion Stoica
Appears in: 
CCR October 2008

Data centers deploy a variety of middleboxes (e.g., firewalls, load balancers and SSL offloaders) to protect, manage and improve the performance of applications and services they run. Since existing networks provide limited support for middleboxes, administrators typically overload path selection mechanisms to coerce traffic through the desired sequences of middleboxes placed on the network path. These ad-hoc practices result in a data center network that is hard to con gure and maintain, wastes middlebox resources, and cannot guarantee middlebox traversal under network churn.

Achieving Convergence-Free Routing using Failure-Carrying Packets

By: 
Karthik Lakshminarayanan, Matthew Caesar, Murali Rangan, Tom Anderson, Scott Shenker, and Ion Stoica
Appears in: 
CCR October 2007

Current distributed routing paradigms (such as link-state, distancevector, and path-vector) involve a convergence process consisting of an iterative exploration of intermediate routes triggered by certain events such as link failures. The convergence process increases router load, introduces outages and transient loops, and slows reaction to failures. We propose a new routing paradigm where the goal is not to reduce the convergence times but rather to eliminate the convergence process completely.

A Data-Oriented (and Beyond) Network Architecture

By: 
Teemu Koponen, Mohit Chawla, Byung-Gon Chun, Andrey Ermolinskiy, Kye Hyun Kim, Scott Shenker, and Ion Stoica
Appears in: 
CCR October 2007

The Internet has evolved greatly from its original incarnation. For instance, the vast majority of current Internet usage is data retrieval and service access, whereas the architecture was designed around host-to-host applications such as telnet and ftp. Moreover, the original Internet was a purely transparent carrier of packets, but now the various network stakeholders use middleboxes to improve security and accelerate applications.

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