Benoit Donnet

On the potential of recommendation technologies for efficient content delivery networks

By: 
Mohamed Ali Kaafar, Shlomo Berkovsky, Benoit Donnet
Appears in: 
CCR July 2013

During the last decade, we have witnessed a substantial change in content delivery networks (CDNs) and user access paradigms. If previously, users consumed content from a central server through their personal computers, nowadays they can reach a wide variety of repositories from virtually everywhere using mobile devices. This results in a considerable time-, location-, and event-based volatility of content popularity.

A first measurement look at the deployment and evolution of thelocator/id separation protocol

By: 
Damien Saucez, Luigi Iannone, Benoit Donnet
Appears in: 
CCR April 2013

During the last decade, we have seen the rise of discussions regarding the emergence of a Future Internet. One of the proposed approaches leverages on the separation of the identifier and the locator roles of IP addresses, leading to the LISP (Locator/Identifier Separation Protocol) protocol, currently under development at the IETF (Internet Engineering Task Force). Up to now, researches made on LISP have been rather theoretical, i.e., based on simulations/emulations often using Internet traffic traces.

Public Review By: 
Sharad Agarwal

The Internet operator and research communities have been lamenting the increase in BGP routing table entries and increase in churn for some time now. Many solutions have been proposed, but few have been deployed. This paper looks at the operational deployment of the Locator/ID Separation Protocol, or LISP. LISP is a protocol that separates two functions of IP addresses -- identifying a communication endpoint, and locating where it is connected to the Internet. This provides flexibility in sending traffic to an endpoint via different connection points or routes, while managing the traditional problems of routing table bloat and churn. As can be seen on the lisp4.net website, the current LISP topology includes over a hundred tunneling routers and a large number of endpoint prefixes. This paper explains LISP, gives an overview of the current deployment, and examines how the performance of LISP has changed over time. The deployment of LISP is still in its early stages and it is premature to do an in-depth research study on it. However, the reviewers agree that this paper provides value to the community as an introduction to the protocol and statistics on the current deployment. The authors have worked diligently with the reviewers to improve their paper.

Revealing MPLS tunnels obscured from traceroute

By: 
Benoit Donnet, Matthew Luckie, Pascal Mérindol, Jean-Jacques Pansiot
Appears in: 
CCR April 2012

Operators have deployed Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) in the Internet for over a decade. However, its impact on Internet topology measurements is not well known, and it is possible for some MPLS configurations to lead to false router-level links in maps derived from traceroute data. In this paper, we introduce a measurement-based classification of MPLS tunnels, identifying tunnels where IP hops are revealed but not explicitly tagged as label switching routers, as well as tunnels that obscure the underlying path.

Public Review By: 
Yin Zhang

Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) has been widely deployed in the Internet. It is well known that MPLS clouds may potentially lead to inaccurate and incomplete Internet maps when performing active measurements using traceroute. In particular, MPLS tunnels may either obscure the underlying path or be incorrectly classified as direct IP links (between IP routers that are not physically adjacent). However, the quantitative impact of MPLS tunnels on Internet topology measurements is not well understood. The paper uses two features to characterize MPLS tunnels: (i) the ttl-propagate option on ingress label edge routers (LERs) and (ii) RFC4950. The ttl-propagate option allows traceroute to reveal IP hops within an MPLS tunnel. RFC4950 implementation provides all information related to a label switched path (LSP). The paper provides a taxonomy of MPLS tunnels: (i) explicit tunnels, which use both ttl-propagate and RFC4950, (ii) implicit tunnels, which use only ttl-propagate, (iii) opaque tunnels, which use only RFC4950, and (iv) invisible tunnels, which use neither option. The paper then develops new inference mechanisms to identify different types of MPLS tunnels and thus reduce the impact of MPLS on IP topology discovery. The focus is on explicit, implicit and opaque tunnels. Based on the new inference techniques, the authors collected a largescale measurement dataset. According to this dataset, a significant fraction (at least 30%) of the paths traverse an MPLS tunnel. Moreover, a significant fraction of MPLS tunnels are not explicitly flagged, but fortunately most of these MPLS tunnels do not obscure IP-level topology discovery. Overall, a nice measurement paper. The topic is timely. The proposed measurement techniques are sound. The findings are interesting and shed light on the impact of MPLS tunnels on IPbased topology discovery. I also expect the techniques developed in this paper to be applied by others in future research on IP-based topology discovery.

IP Geolocation Databases: Unreliable?

By: 
Ingmar Poese, Steve Uhlig, Mohamed Ali Kaafar, Benoit Donnet, and Bamba Gueye
Appears in: 
CCR April 2011

The most widely used technique for IP geolocation consists in building a database to keep the mapping between IP blocks and a geographic location. Several databases are available and are frequently used by many services and web sites in the Internet. Contrary to widespread belief, geolocation databases are far from being as reliable as they claim. In this paper, we conduct a comparison of several current geolocation databases -both commercial and free- to have an insight of the limitations in their usability.

The 2nd Workshop on Active Internet Measurements (AIMS-2) Report

By: 
kc claffy, Emile Aben, Jordan Auge, Robert Beverly, Fabian Bustamante, Benoit Donnet, Timur Friedman, Marina Fomenkov, Peter Haga, Matthew Luckie, and Yuval Shavitt
Appears in: 
CCR October 2010

On February 8-10, 2010, CAIDA hosted the second Workshop on Active Internet Measurements (AIMS-2) as part of our series of Internet Statistics and Metrics Analysis (ISMA) workshops. The goals of this workshop were to further our understanding of the potential and limitations of active measurement research and infrastructure in the wide-area Internet, and to promote cooperative solutions and coordinated strategies to addressing future data needs of the network and security research communities.

On BGP Communities

By: 
Benoit Donnet and Olivier Bonaventure
Appears in: 
CCR April 2008

This paper focuses on BGP communities, a particular BGP attribute that has not yet been extensively studied by the research community. It allows an operator to group destinations in a single entity to which the same routing decisions might be applied. In this paper, we show that the usage of this attribute has increased and that it also contributes to routing table growth. In addition, we propose a taxonomy of BGP community attributes to allow operators to better document their communities. We further manually collect information on BGP communities and tag it according to our taxonomy.

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